Healing Foot Sores Through Christ’s Authority

The leg is full of rampant foot sores. Lord, how can this be?

How can your church have lost so much of its authority?

The Pharisees have plagued us with traditions made by man,

While Sadducees who don’t believe have mired us in quicksand.

They’ve dumped the dirt of criticism schisms on our feet.

Their sandy brine is full of slime, their clubs made of concrete.

With vengeful “sovereignty” they’ve wailed us so we scarce can stand.

To be plagued with a Job’s disease they claim is something grand.

“That poor guy’s suffering foot sores for the Lord, and so should you.

Don’t stand in faith but lamely claim your pity party stew.”

To Job they look and hold the verse “He gives and takes away.”

But what does God’s full Word upon this subject have to say?

 

It seems that once Job truly saw the Lord and understood

His character and that God for his life desired good,

His foot sores went away, for double was restored to him,

Because he heard the gospel preached upon that road so slim.

 

The whirlwind blew away all questions as to God’s true power,

Restoring health and sanity To Job that very hour.

This understanding gave to Job the awesome revelation

Of who God truly was to Him In every situation.

For as believers seek not only God’s gifts but His face,

How can they help but understand the fullness of His grace,

His true desire to save and heal, by His authority,

Not through opinions taught by man but supernaturally?

 

Healing isn’t about religious rules and regulations, but some people in rebelling against religious hypocrisy, deny the idea of supernatural manifestations altogether. We must return to true authority based on a knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ and His Word. That’s the way to see miraculous healings take place.

 

Mercy, Not Sacrifice Part II: A Good Report

God could have told the devil, “Job is way too proud for me.

His self-reliance doth defy my law of liberty.

His armpits drip with fear. His brow reeks with uncertainty.

It’s utter foolishness. Why don’t you humble him for me?”

 

But God, who’s rich in mercy, didn’t take that tack at all.

His heart was not to set the innocent up for a fall.

His goal, it seems, was to reveal the gospel to this man,

For the One who suffers with us all had formed a mighty plan.

 

It wasn’t something Job could understand inside his head,

Or wrap his mind around. He must experience it instead:

Not from a savior’s point of view, but from a sinner’s seat.

He must sit in the pit of misery and feel the heat.

 

Until you’ve truly suffered, it is hard to understand

The Father’s fervent love for you, the mercy he has planned.

For pain that has no purpose lacks the mighty healing touch

That flows from stripes laid on the back of Him who cares so much!

 

Was Job a sinner like the rest of us? Well, in the midst of Job’s suffering, after Satan has afflicted him, he asks God, “How many are my iniquities and sins? Make me to know my transgression and my sin. Wherefore hidest thou thy face, and holdest me for thine enemy?… For thou writest bitter things against me, and makest me to possess the iniquities of my youth.” (Job 13:23-26)

The reference to iniquities in his youth show that Job was not perfect in the sense of being sinless. However, exposing those sins is not the purpose of the Job book, for when you read the beginning, you see no mention of God punishing him for those sins. Like every man, Job had his flaws, but when God spoke to Satan about Job, He left the past in the past and focused on Job’s good points.

“Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?” (Job 1:8 KJV)

Job was a man like no other, and God had blessed him in his work. Throughout the land there was no equal when it came to fearing God and eschewing evil (to eschew evil = tell evil to “shoo!”)

God spoke glowingly to Satan of Job’s perfect behavior, just as He spoke well of His creation in the book of Genesis. He called everything He made “very good,” not “very bad.” Even after the first people sinned, he didn’t call them bad names. Instead, He provided the promise of a Savior, the “seed of the woman” who would crush the serpent’s head (Genesis 3:15)

Do you feel guilty over something you’ve done? Do sins of the past continue to haunt you? If so, what do you imagine God would say? Would He yell at you to stop messing up and order you to get your act together?

Note that God did not accuse Job before Satan. Satan was the one who accused Job before God. “If you take away his blessings, he’ll curse you to your face.”

For the purpose of proving Satan wrong, God allowed him to afflict Job – not once, but twice. Job lost his business and his family in one day. It was all wiped out. His business was attacked by Sabeans and Chaldeans. All his animals were killed and so were all his employees.

In fact, before every test Job endures, God is quick to point out what Job has done right.

“Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? And still he holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without a cause.” (Job 2:3)

Although it may seem as if God was, in fact, punishing Job, the purpose of the test is clearly not to find fault with Job but to prove the glory of God’s good name. For the sufferings of Job are nothing compared to the sufferings of Christ, yet in the book of Job we find some small picture of those sufferings, and (at the end) a spiritual resurrection from the dead.

 

Mercy Over Sacrifice Part II: A Good Report

Mercy over sacrifice, that’s what it’s all about.

Mercy over sacrifice, there truly is no doubt

That God prefers mercy over all sacrifice made by man.

It’s not about man’s sacrifice but God’s own gospel plan.

 

We see God’s mercy demonstrated in the book of Job

(Which doesn’t rhyme with mob but with words like ‘ear lobe’).

The book starts off with Job, who’s working hard to please the Lord,

And yet what God requires is much more than he can afford.

 

Mercy over sacrifice is what God does prefer,

Yet Job, it seems, relies on his own efforts to ensure

That nothing bad will happen to him or his family,

Concerned for his children, he sacrifices constantly.

 

Now, God could have told Satan, “Job is way too proud for me.

His self-reliance does defy my law of liberty.

Job’s armpits drip with fear. His brow reeks with uncertainty.

It’s utter foolishness. Why don’t you humble him for me?”

 

But God, who’s rich in mercy, didn’t take that tack at all.

His heart was not to set the innocent up for a fall.

His goal, it seems, was to reveal the gospel to this man,

For the One who suffers with us all had formed a mighty plan.

 

It wasn’t something Job could understand inside his head,

Or wrap his mind around. He must experience it instead:

Not from a savior’s point of view, but from a sinner’s seat.

He must sit in the pit of misery and feel the heat.

 

Until you’ve truly suffered, it is hard to understand

The Father’s fervent love for you, the mercy he has planned.

For pain that has no purpose lacks the mighty healing touch

That flows from stripes laid on the back of Him who cares so much!

 

It’s mercy over sacrifice, for through God’s stripes we’re healed.

For through Christ’s sacrifice God’s wondrous mercy is revealed.

 

When you read through the book of Job, you see he wasn’t perfect. For though he worked hard and sacrificed greatly for his family, something was missing in his life. There were things about God that He didn’t understand. For example, in the midst of Job’s suffering, after Satan has afflicted him, he asks God, “How many sins have I committed? Show me! What have I done wrong? Why do hide your face from me and treat me like your enemy? … For you write bitter things against me, and make me to possess the iniquities of my youth.” (Job 13:23-26)

The reference to iniquities in his youth show that Job was not perfect in the sense of being sinless. However, exposing those sins is not the purpose of the Job book, for when you read the beginning, you see no mention of God punishing him for those sins. Like every man, Job had his flaws, but when God spoke to Satan about Job, He left the past in the past and focused on Job’s good points.

“Have you considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that fears God, and eschews evil?” (Job 1:8 KJV) Note: to eschew does not mean to chew on. If anything, it means the exact opposite!

The fact remains, Job was a man like no other, and God had blessed him in his work. Throughout the land there was no equal when it came to fearing God and eschewing evil (to eschew evil = tell evil to “shoo!”)

God spoke glowingly to Satan of Job’s perfect behavior, just as He spoke well of His creation in the book of Genesis. He called everything He made “very good,” not “very bad.” Even after the first people sinned, he didn’t call them bad names. Instead, He provided the promise of a Savior, the “seed of the woman” who would crush the serpent’s head (Genesis 3:15). No sacrifice of man could ever atone for his sin, but from the beginning God chose mercy over sacrifice: His mercy, not man’s mercy. There’s a big difference between the two.

After all, to forgive is divine but to feel guilty is human. If you’ve ever felt guilty for something you’ve done, join the club! Do sins of the past continue to haunt you? If so, then what do you imagine God would say? Would He yell at you to stop messing up and order you to get your act together? Would He demand more sacrifice from you? Some people sacrifice continually, trying to please God and/or provide for their families. But it never seems to be enough. Inside they feel condemned, but God’s heart is not to condemn them.

Note that God did not accuse Job before Satan. Satan was the one who accused Job before God. “If you take away his blessings, he’ll curse you to your face.”

For the purpose of proving Satan wrong, God allowed him to afflict Job – not once, but twice. Job lost his business and his family in one day. It was all wiped out. His business was attacked by Sabeans and Chaldeans. All his animals were killed and so were all his employees.

In fact, before every test Job endures, God is quick to point out what Job has done right.

“Have you considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that fears God, and eschews evil? And still he holds fast his integrity, although thou moved me against him, to destroy him without a cause.” (Job 2:3)

Although it may seem as if God was, in fact, punishing Job, the purpose of the test is clearly not to find fault with Job but to prove the glory of God’s good name. For the sufferings of Job are nothing compared to the sufferings of Christ, yet in the book of Job we find some small picture of those sufferings, and (at the end) a spiritual resurrection from the dead.

https://miracle-times.com/accusation/why-god-why/

Mercy, Not Sacrifice (based loosely on the first chapter of the book of Job)

“I sacrifice, I sacrifice,” the righteous man did say.

“Long hours I toil to satisfy my darling’s needs each day.

This job consumes my life, dear, but I do it all for you,

From Monday up through Saturday, and now on Sundays too.

For me there is no Sabbath rest. I’m married to my work.

It has me in an iron grip. My work I dare not shirk.

You say you want my time, but I do not have it to give.

You see how hard I slave so that my family might live.”

 

And so, the man with fervor climbed his ladder of success,

Although the burden on his shoulders caused him much distress,

For when it came to serving God, he feared his kids might fail,

And that he never would reap any fruit from his travail.

He saw the way they partied. Had they cursed God in their hearts?

Then he must work to save them all from Satan’s fiery darts!

The best of his own toil and sweat this righteous man did pour

Into a fragrant offering that God could not ignore.

 

The best of all he had he sacrificed continually

That God’s forgiveness might rain down on them and set them free.

The man was truly duty-bound. He had no other choice.

Yet his own fleshly toil gave him no reason to rejoice.

For no blood of an animal could satisfy God’s law,

Because such sacrifices are not totally without flaw.

Nor can the righteousness of man atone for sinful pride.

It’s just like fig leaves, leaving him with no true place to hide.

 

Man’s best attempt at righteousness is like a filthy rag,

According to Isaiah. There ‘s no gold inside that bag.

How then can wasted time and talents ever be redeemed?

Not even he whose name was Job could come up with a scheme!

If even he, the man most upright, didn’t have the “stuff,”

Then how could anybody else attempt to do enough?

The truth is, God had His own plan which Job could not yet see,

Until one day he caught God’s notice unexpectedly.

 

Scriptures

Isaiah 64:6   Romans 3:23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why, God, Why?

“Why, God? Why did you do this to me?” Job wondered aloud as he sat cross-legged on the ground. The sores that covered him from head to toe were like tiny pricks of fire, and he was like a pin cushion. Ouch, ouch, ouch! He picked up a broken piece of piece of pottery, one small remnant of his shattered life, and scratched himself with it. His flesh was withered away. He looked like skin and bones. His breath was so bad, his wife wouldn’t come near him. To top it all off, he had a terrible case of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Thankfully, the story records, Job doesn’t curse God for his sickness or for the stress. However, he does blame God for it. Apparently, he doesn’t realize Satan is the source of his sickness. In Revelation 12:9-10, Satan is described as the “accuser of the brethren.” Not only does He accuse believers before God, but he also accuses God before believers. In Genesis chapter 3, the story of man’s fall, Satan is at work through the serpent, calling God a liar. He accuses Him of withholding good from Adam and Eve by forbidding them to eat of the knowledge of good and evil. I believe he also accuses God before Job, blaming Him for tragedies and sicknesses he himself caused.

Satan’s lies cause horrible pain, and it really gets to Job – so much so that he even goes so far as to curse the day of his birth. I don’t know about you, but he sounds a little suicidal. I can picture his friends holding their noses as they try to cheer him up, by insinuating that his nasty boils and bad odor are due to some horrific sin.

“God must be punishing you,” is basically what they tell him.

But Job insists he has done nothing to deserve punishment. In fact, in chapter 29, he boasts about all the good things he has done:

delivering the poor and the fatherless when they cried out, and those who had no one to help them (verse 12);

causing the widow’s heart to “sing for joy” (verse 13);

being “eyes to the blind” an “feet to the lame” (verse 15);

being a father to the poor (verse 16);

breaking the jaws of the wicked, and plucking the spoil out of his teeth (verse 17).

Job seems to feel that God has judged him unfairly. He is proud of all the good works he has done. What he fails to recognize in his discourse is that all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23).

“For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: not of works, lest any man should boast.” (Ephesians 2:8-9)

As Job continues to justify himself, one young man named Elihu is greatly disturbed by the lack of truth coming forth. He encourages everyone to stop speculating about why God has allowed Job to suffer and to consider God’s amazing power. He urges them to think about all the great things God has done.

“Suffer me a little, and I will shew thee that I have yet to speak on God’s behalf,” he tells them in Job chapter 36, verse 2. “I will fetch my knowledge from afar and will ascribe righteousness to my Maker.” (verse 3).

When Elihu is finished with his speech, God speaks to Job through a whirlwind. It is an encounter that brings Job to his knees. “I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear: but now mine eye seeth thee,” he tells the LORD. After Job prays for those friends of his who have not spoken the right thing about God, God restores what the enemy stole from him. He has twice as much as he had before. The latter end of Job’s life is more blessed at the beginning. Presumably, he is healed, for, after all, healing is a blessing.

So, what can we take away from this story? I believe that one thing can learn from it is this: It’s one thing to experience God’s healing power. It’s another thing to get to know the Healer, to see Him as He really is instead of basing your knowledge on hearsay. The best way to get to know God is by reading His Word, in a way that lets it to sink deep into your heart. If we want Him in our hearts, we must invite Him in.

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.” Revelation 3:20