Healing by Immersion in God’s Word

I. Humility, God’s Word, and the Jordan River

 

As Naaman took dip one in Jordan’s river,

Humbling himself wholly before Christ,

God’s word began to penetrate his skin cells

And struck him as a bit of good advice.

 

First taste of faith. Step out and take a break now.

Dry off. Relax. Into your chariot climb.

Then see your servants’ arms crossed, feet a-tapping.

They’re right, of course. Let’s try it one more time.

 

Dip two: Submerge the body head to toe, guy.

Come up again with goosebumps. That was wild!

Could be Elisha’s word is truly working.

And yet the change appears to be quite mild.

 

But on the third dip, how the water tried him,

A burning flame to tame his leprous skin!

“Oh, what have I gotten myself into?”

Asked Naaman with his face full of chagrin.

 

II. Let’s God’s Word Go Deep

 

Set aside your own agenda, dear commander, and obey.

Immerse yourself within it. There’s healing in this Word.

It must sink deep within you to remove the icy berg.

 

It is the berg of unbelief. We see it on the surface.

It’s floating on your skin. To shame you is its purpose.

Beneath it lies a mountain that can tumble the Titanic.

Only the Man of perfect faith can tread on that Atlantic.

 

Your berg of doubt would block the faith that God seeks to impart.

You must let Him dissolve the rock of pride that’s in your heart.

One dip is not enough to penetrate such stubborn soil.

You can’t get rid of it with fervent sweat or fearful toil.

 

No river of Damascus can remove your ingrown sin,

But bathing in the flow of God’s good news gives peace within.

Transgression may rise up, but much more does God’s grace abound,

With drastic change that places your feet back on solid ground.

 

You do not need a man to wave his hand over the spot.

Just take the word, believe it, exercise the faith you’ve got

By soaking in the scriptures. Drink His truth in, undiluted,

For which no earthly medicine can well be substituted.

 

Behold the stones that testify to Christ’s amazing power

To make God’s flood of judgment part that you might now cross over,

receiving sweet for bitter, mercy streams to end all strife,

For all who do believe in Him have passed from death to life.

 

 

The Old Man and his Germy Rags – Who Wants Them?

Once there was an old man who found bargains worth good money.

Those germy rags looked stunning in the land of milk of honey.

They dripped with odes to worldly fame, success, prosperity.

This military man was rich and plundered them for free.

But when it came to TRUE wealth, he was poor as poor could be.

A social outcast when it came to God’s kingdom was he.

That’s because his name was Naaman. He had leprosy.

A stranger to God’s people and God’s promises was he.

 

The Lord had made a banquet from which Naaman couldn’t eat,

Because the germy rags he wore, they didn’t smell so sweet.

His sin-stained garments stunk like skunk. He dared not enter near,

Lest in God’s light of truth his inward nakedness appear.

A little girl with child-like faith he’d stolen saw it though,

And pointed this old man to one through whom God’s word did flow.

“There is a prophet from my land who has the cure you need.”

Into the old man’s sin-sick heart she sowed a precious seed.

 

Meanwhile, the germy rags of human reasoning got him lost.

Wrapped ‘round his eyes, they led him to believe he was the boss

He understood authority – no question about that,

But when it came to wisdom, he was blinder than a bat.

 

His message caused a king to tear his robes in hot despair.

“I cannot cure this man!” he grumbled, angry as a bear.

Elisha finally intervened: “Direct the man to me.”

He had a word of prophecy to heal the leprosy

 

Of one whose mind was focused on a “quick and easy sell.”

“He’ll wave his hand over the spot and I will be made well,”

Thought Naaman, who had brought with him a stack of  “bargain clothes”

To please his nagging wife who said “You must get rid of those.”

 

“They are so worn and germy, I can’t stand to bear the sight.

So, when you’re cured, please throw them out. They make me too uptight.

Get rid of them by any means you possibly can find,

And get yourself some brand new duds before I lose my mind.”

 

“Yeah, right,” her spouse agreed. “I’ll do it if you say so, dear,”

Not knowing God required more than might at first appear.

For Naaman wanted healing but would not let God too near.

Elisha seemed to pick up on his lack of holy fear,

 

Because instead of meeting the commander face to face,

He sent a messenger to say, “Seek out the special place,

A river of humility, where miracles abound,

Remove your clothes, bathe seven times. Your skin shall then be sound.”

 

Proud Naaman balked at this. “I must get naked, take a bath?”

He stormed off in a rage, and his poor servants felt the wrath.

With kindness they persuaded him to do as he was told.

So, Naaman dipped in Jordan, and his wrinkled skin so old

Took on a freshness reminiscent of a little child.

Rejoicing in his new attire – how soft, how fresh, how mild!

He offered to repay Elisha for his healing word,

Only to hear, “The water’s free. To pay would be absurd!”

 

Gehazi, though, was eager for some quick prosperity.

He drooled for Naaman’s worldly wealth and “What’s in it for me?”

He lied to get the old man’s garments which were not germ-free.

That’s how Elisha’s servant ended up with leprosy.

 

The Cure for Human Reasoning and Tasteless Seasoning

I. When Human Reason Equates to Tasteless Seasoning

                       (Based on II Kings 7:2)

 

There once was a man whose reasoning

Was like a tasteless seasoning.

Like salt that’s lost its flavor,

It simply would not let him savor

The truths locked up inside God’s Word –

In this case, prophecy he’d heard:

That, “About this time tomorrow”

God would end the city’s sorrow,

And this town by famine torn

Would have good reason not to mourn

Because the “shepherd of the sheep”

Would make the food supply so cheap.

 

But in a town besieged with war,

This reasoning man could not ignore

The bitter strum of endless doubt

Which in his hungry ears did shout,

“On your own strength you must rely.

For it you don’t, you’ll surely die.”

 

II. Human Reasoning Can Lead to Doubt

 

So, when Elisha gave the word,

He chose to question what he heard.

Instead of shouting, “What great news!”

He sort of blew a little fuse,

Recoiling almost instantly.

“You make it sound as if it’s free!”

 

“Who are you – some cute Pollyanna

Trusting God to rain down manna?

How He would do that, I can’t see.

But even so, how could it be?

My human reasoning says no,

It cannot fly, it will not go.”

 

This man on whom the king did lean

Could not accept what he’d not seen.

Nor could this person understand

What his intellect could not command

But let his reasoning replace

The mighty wonders of God’s grace.

 

III.  Jesus Can Cure Tasteless Seasoning Caused by Human Reasoning

 

He had allowed his faith to rust

And so lay trampled in the dust.

But that need not be so with us

If we’ll let Jesus steer our “bus.”

For He is THE true bread from heaven

Whose Word can counteract the leaven

 

Of legalism and deceit,

The tasteless salt we cannot eat.

He adds true flavor to the meat

Of joy that makes our lives so sweet.

His faith enables us to receive

What human reasoning won’t believe.

 

 

 

From Inedible to Incredible

The potluck was incredible

Because it wasn’t edible.

The prophets, starved for food to eat,

Were tasting bitter fruit, not sweet.

 

To them it wasn’t edible,

A fact that seemed incredible

Because the guy who messed it up

Had put some wild gourds in their cup.

 

They knew he had an eye for vines

He must have known were not for wines.

But from the Lord he had not heard

Unless, “Go kill them,” was His word.

 

The prophets groaned in one accord,

“Did he not hear right from the Lord?

Perhaps from God he has not heard.

We think he’s dumber than a bird.”

 

“And why did God not warn us too

By telling us, ‘Don’t eat that stew?’

We wish He’d warned us to beware

That those wild gourds weren’t fit to share.”,

 

“That other prophet should have prayed,

Received God’s word and then obeyed,”

Fumed one who sought a stomach pump

To help the poor prophetic chump

 

Who lay complaining on the ground

But by Elisha soon was found.

“Don’t worry, we can save this guy,”

Proclaimed the prophet. “He won’t die.”

 

“Nor shall the stew be hard to fix

If we contribute to the mix

A meal called “Jesus Did It All;

And His Grace Saves Us From The Fall.”

 

“For no one lives by bread alone,”

But by each word sent from God’s throne.”

So, that’s how they repaired the food.

Then everyone was feeling good

 

Because the food was edible,

But more than that – incredible!

Like living waters, fresh and clean,

Better than wheat Ruth did glean.

 

Instead of making prophets ill,

It made their churning stomachs still

Because by Jesus’ stripes we’re healed

His broken body has revealed

 

The blood He shed to make us whole,

Heal the body and save the soul.

Therefore, it’s not just edible.

It’s totally incredible!

 

(Based on the story in II Kings 4:38-41, with reference to Matthew 26:26-28, Mark 14:22-24, and Luke 22:19-20)

 

https://miracle-times.com/miracles/miracles-good-fruit-persecution/

https://miracle-times.com/hearing-gods-voice/know-gods-will-submit/

https://miracle-times.com/mental-health/regain-sanity-jesus-christ/

https://miracle-times.com/poetry/mystery-hidden-parables/

Healing by Immersion in God’s Word

Dip seven times in Jordan, the prophet to Naaman did say.

Set aside your own agenda, dear commander, and obey.

Immerse yourself within it. There’s healing in this Word.

It must sink deep within you to remove the icy berg.

 

It is the berg of unbelief. We see it on the surface.

It’s floating on your skin. To shame you is its purpose.

Beneath it lies a mountain that can tumble the Titanic.

Only the Man of perfect faith can tread on that Atlantic.

 

Your berg of doubt would block the faith that God seeks to impart.

You must let Him dissolve the rock of pride that’s in your heart.

One dip is not enough to penetrate such stubborn soil.

You can’t get rid of it with fervent sweat or fearful toil.

 

No river of Damascus can remove your ingrown sin,

But bathing in the flow of God’s good news gives peace within.

Transgression may rise up, but much more does God’s grace abound,

With drastic change that places your feet back on solid ground.

 

You do not need a man to wave his hand over the spot.

Just take the word, believe it, exercise the faith you’ve got

By soaking in the scriptures. Drink His truth in, undiluted,

For which no earthly medicine can well be substituted.

 

Behold the stones that testify to Christ’s amazing power

To make God’s flood of judgment part that you might now cross over,

receiving sweet for bitter, mercy streams to end all strife,

For all who do believe in Him have passed from death to life.